GNU PSPP on OSX Yosemite

I have a project I’m working on that requires the use of a data analysis tool like IBM’s SPSS but at about six thousand dollars per year, it’s a little out of reach. There is an open source project, fortunately, that provides all the functionality I need for a lot less.

PSPP is, according to the project website:

“…designed as a Free replacement for SPSS. That is to say, it behaves as experienced SPSS users would expect, and their system files and syntax files can be used in PSPP with little or no modification, and will produce similar results (the actual numbers should be identical). The number of variables and cases is limited only by the computer architecture.”

There are a number of ways of getting PSPP depending on your operating system: I am a Mac OSX user running 10.10.5 Yosemite so installed it using MacPorts. As this is a brand new machine I’m installing it on, I needed to install MacPorts first: download and run the install package from the download page, update and then run the install (you need super user privilege):

$ sudo port selfupdate
$ sudo port install pspp

This will give you a working PSPP from the command line. If you want to use the graphical user interface over PSPP, known as PSPPIRE, you’ll need to update your X11 DISPLAY driver by downloading and installing XQuartz which is a community produced X-window server assisted but not supported by Apple. Once you’ve installed Quartz, you’ll need to log out and in again to update the DISPLAY environment. Once this is done you can launch the GUI version of PSPP from the command line:

$ sudo psppire

This allows you to work with your SPSS data sets and command files almost without modification.

PhD: pronounced “phud”

cover-7-2-3-borderFive months in, and I can’t find a way of shutting off those bells ringing in my head. Fortunately, James Hayton (@jameshaytonphd) has just published his little book, “PhD: An uncommon guide to research, writing & PhD life“.

James has a PhD in Physics yet his helpful and reassuring guidance has been incredibly useful to me (my research is in education) at this point. He has given me some clarity in my view of the various aspects of undertaking a programme like this. Some of the things that had been worrying me include note-taking when reading; organising my thinking in respect of the research approach; working with tools; project management for academic purposes; and being focused about skills development.

I recommend it to all current PhD students and those thinking about it. If you can’t find the twenty quid for the book right now, pop over to James’ blog to find some brilliant articles of interest and relevance. If you have an hour, sit back and enjoy his 2013 talk at the University of Edinburgh, available on YouTube:

Efficient, searchable logging

I’ve been trying to find out what is the best way – for me – to keep a record of readings, meetings, seminars and the other stuff of studying to become a researcher. I begin a part time PhD in September and as I will have severe demands on my time for the day job, need to be sure that I work smart.

I thought about all kinds of tools for this. The first thing to realise is that I will probably be making use of pen and paper as the ultimate portable and immediate way to organise my thinking. I’ve done this since 1976 and have a wall full of diaries and notes back to that time. Despite being a technophile, I have tried and failed to like any of the web or tablet based services like Evernote. I want to capture images, probably like this photo of hand-written notes. I want what I record to be searchable.

So, what am I going to try? A combination of email and blogging. I already have the blog you’re reading and this post is made using the JetPack “post by email” feature. I wonder if it will work?

Acts of Defiance in the Back Channel

Continuing an act of defiance by taking time out of my work schedule this week, I attended a second lecture by George Veletsianos at Edinburgh University, entitled “MOOCs, automation, artificial intelligence, and pedagogical agents”. This seminar was a special event put on by DICE – the Digital Cultures in Education research group.

The lecture and subsequent discussion was rich and well-informed, as there was a good range of expertise and engagement in the room and from the online participants accessing via the streaming feed. George’s lecture was stimulating and provocative: without overdoing the detail, he managed to tackle MOOCs as a socio-cultural phenomenon. He described the usual rationale for MOOCs of costs and the perceptions that drive their explosion onto the educational landscape but he also gave us new (to me) truths about their origin and the assumptions underpinning their popularity.

Moving on to the automation of teaching, George treated us to a quick history, again, touching the nerves of the implementation of human-computer interaction in education. There was much discussion of this with the final topic of pedagogical agents: perhaps misnamed “bots” in the debate that ensued in the question session and on the twitter back channel.

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I can’t do justice to the scope of the issues raised and picked over in today’s two-hour session, not least because of the richness of them. Also, perhaps, for fear of misrepresenting the nuances. I resorted to my comfort zone of scurrilous tweeting, suggesting first that rather than choosing a gender or cultural stereotype for my preferred pedagogical agent, I would choose Brian, the Family Guy dog. This got me followed by Peter Griffin. When I started another cartoon (above), Marshall Dozier outed me with a tweet.