Scottish Learning Festival ’13, Day 2

I was lucky enough to be able to attend both days of the SLF this year. The focus on the second day for me was very much that of professional development for teachers.

gridThis began with a little reflection on the variability in the quality of CPD accessed by teachers. In my experience, this has ranged in two dimensions from very good to very bad and from relevant to irrelevant. I was thinking in particular of Wednesday night’s teachmeet, which, like all teachmeets I’ve attended, contained a range of talks and professional development which I would plot somewhere mid-to-right-of-centre on our grid, ranging between ±70% of the relevancy scale. The plot shown here is meant to be representative, not a specific critique of any presentation or session.

Petra
Professor Petra Wend, Chair of the NIB

Petra Wend chaired a round table session with some of her colleagues on the National Implementation Board providing short stimulus talks: Graeme Logan, Susan Quinn and Glenn Rodger. Delegates, aided by table facilitators, debated several questions around the challenges faced by the NIB and came up with a number of key questions which expressed the consensus of the principal concerns of those present. The output of the round table will be published at the Teaching Scotland’s Future website. Whilst you’re clicking around, take a look some of these other places, too: firstly, the Aspiring Teachers site which includes a check of literacy and numeracy for those thinking about a career in teaching in Scotland. Are you up to the minimum standard to teach here?

Second, the Framework for Educational Leadership is of direct relevance to you as a teacher, even if you think that “leadership” is something that ambitious, unprincipled putative deputes are desperate to shove up your nose. We are all leaders of learning and the opportunities provided by CfE to break out of the silos that have traditionally bunkered our creativity are going to be realised when all teachers take on the mantle of true educational leadership in order to bring the best of opportunities to their students. Look out for the development and sharing of good examples, called for by delegates at the round table today. Get ready for the Scottish College for Educational Leadership, coming very soon. There’s a heads-up on Margery McMahon’s blog (I was at Margery’s table today).

Finally, is the GTCS Practitioner enquiry resource which will give you a heads up on the new expectations for all teachers to evaluate methods, ditching those that don’t work and replacing them with those that do, based upon evidence from action research in their own classrooms.

The last session I attended at the SLF this year was a good example of practitioner enquiry and professional update: Caroline Bayne and Pauline Gilhooley gave a fascinating presentation of Edinburgh’s model for professional development course called, “Enhancing Classroom Practice”, which follows a well-established model rooted in masters-level reading, critical thinking, practitioner enquiry and reflection. Broadly the model follows these steps in three phases of the course, which will not be unfamiliar to those who undertook the Chartered Teacher programme:

  • Literature review
  • Critical reading
  • Research methods
  • Changes to practice
  • Measurement of impact
  • Evaluation

Although the Edinburgh course does not as yet attract accreditation, it looks like it might be possible in the right partnership with a local university and I am sure that dialogue along these lines will have taken place.

I’ll wrap up my report of the second day of the SLF with a (remembered) quote, shared by Professor Wend in the round table this morning:

research shows that having better qualified teachers results in better learning experiences

Personally, I would rather this was stated as “better educated” teachers, but the point is well made. If you know what you’re doing, then what you do, you do better.

Scottish Learning Festival ’13, Day 1

sparseThe Scottish Learning Festival this year looks at first sight to be less than it once was. The exhibition space is significantly reduced and the footprint of the event on the SECC seems similarly diminished. Indeed, when I arrived at my usual time of a little before 8 to catch up with the “usual crowd”, they and the coffee culture bars were conspicuous in their absence.

Eventually, however, the buzz of teachers revelling in a day’s respite from the pressures of CfE, assessment, reporting, The Management, development and the NAR, soon filled the corridors of the venue. Estimates of four thousand delegates or more for this year seem optimistic but the registration desks were busy with people grabbing the opportunity to attend some of the many seminars and events running this year.

FeorleanBy the time I was shuffling into the Lomond for the Minister’s keynote, I had pressed the flesh with a good number of “the usual suspects” and was feeling good about coming through to the wild west for the day. The keynote itself was what it always is with Mike Russell – a stunning display of eloquent fast thinking, masterly deflection and a little more party political dogma than the delegates were comfortable with or entitled to. The presentation of the inaugural Robert Owen award seemed a little weird, with so many incredibly innovative educators in Scotland, as it was awarded to a fully-deserving-but-never-heard-of-in-Scotland educator from overseas who happened to be speaking at the conference this year. Doug Belshaw expressed the zeitgeist well.

It’s often a bit of a gamble when picking seminars to attend and I have once or twice been disappointed in the past. This year was no exception as the first session I attended was pitched as, “Science Challenges to Inspire and Motivate”. I forgave myself for thinking that this was going to be innovative and new. It wasn’t. It was no more than a badly-delivered sales pitch from an independent sector head of Chemistry who has set himself up a wee business on the side selling ideas remarkably similar to those found in other places, including the courses I teach at Edinburgh University.

In contrast, the afternoon session I attended on Developing early number concepts, delivered by Craig Lowther and Mandy Milton from Moray, was a high-quality and pragmatic session which itself used exemplary andragogy. This team shared some really rich ideas for developing number concepts in young children, including some highly effective and dirt-cheap resources, backed up by evidence of its efficacy and clear strategies for supporting teachers and parents. This was one of the best sessions I have seen in the past 6 years at the SLF.

CLA_20bigcolour72dpiAlthough the rest of the day was busy with meetings, touring the small exhibition, chatting to exhibitors and other delegates, the evening teachmeet event at the SQA was the butter icing in the cake of the day. The event was recorded and will be available to listen to over at edutalk.cc. There was the usual eclectic but nevertheless interesting mix of talks and round tables. I joined in with Frank Crawford‘s session on what makes a great teacher and really enjoyed the debate as we tried to identify what we, as educators, thought made a great one.

A number of us finished the day in a bar, eating and drinking, courtesy of the teachmeet sponsors CLA (thank you), who not only facilitated the event itself, but also contributed to the “common weal” by delivering a short talk on copyright and schools.

So, I’m sitting in the Key West cafe at the SECC as the place wakes up, having demanded coffee, pastries and a place to write well before opening time. I’ve been accommodated with all of these and the cheery people-centric demeanour of the staff here that is the characteristic of this curate’s egg of a country. For all that it’s a work in progress, I still believe that it offers the best place to work in education, in the world.

AudioBoo for Education

audioboo-t_7I’ve been a user of AudioBoo for some time now, and have recorded a few dozen commentaries, some of which have been listened to thousands of times. I find it an excellent tool for easy podcasting and most of my broadcasts are automatically cross-posted to iTunes and edutalk.cc. I’m pleased to find that audioBoo have launched this week a facility for educators who might consider the power of audio for their learners. From the announcement:

…we’re delighted to announce the launch of Audioboo for Education: a new initiative to help students and educators to enrich the learning experience and encourage conversation and debate through the power of audio.

Apart from ideas and examples of how audioBoo can be used to support and enhance learning, there’s also an intelligent and useful app for Edmodo, the VLE of choice for many teachers.

New channels of engagement are essential to the flipped classroom and the enabling of access to education on the learner’s terms, which is something that if you’re an educator and not driving it, then it will soon be driving you. Why not try it? It’s free, it’s easy and it offers leverage to your impact on learners: if you want an example, my most recent public talk has reached hundreds more through the podcast than it did in the flesh, so to speak.