Learn code

codeOver fifty years ago, my father was a US Air Force signals operator: he, like any other professional in communication, had to learn the languages of communication, command and control. I still have the LP (long-playing record, what the kids call “vinyl” now, although these weren’t vinyl) record set that he listened to as he learned Morse Code.

Today’s young people live in a world of communication and it is increasingly important for them – and all users – to at least have an appreciation of the languages used by the systems that pervade our modern lives. Learning to code – and the computational thinking that goes with it – is fun and interesting as well as being intellectually good for you. It’s also potentially lucrative: coding skills are at a premium, wherever you are in the world. While there is still a need for certain people to know Morse Code, there are many other languages to know about: from the languages of data to the logic of a sick (sic) 3D immersive games experience.

I have carried a link to CodeCademy on this site for some time because they offer some excellent resources and courses for people to learn how to code. I have used some of them myself and recommend them highly. If you’re not sure where to start, there is  a visual overview of the main programming languages and possible benefits of learning each one to help you make an informed decision. You can find it here: http://wiht.link/learncodeguide.

DISCLAIMER: I am not connected with Codecademy and have received no financial or other incentive to write this post. The infographic is not Codecademy’s and includes links to other free online places where you can learn. It’s just a good idea and a good place to get started. Get on with it!